Things Involving Me

momo-deary:

bumblecake:

painted-bees:

jeanox:

Little nugget of advice that really changed the way I approached painting. When I started blending like this it was a real turning point for my art quality.

Forgot to add that lighting conditions and other variables in a piece make the hardness you want to choose somewhat variable. Drawing things like skin is more of a hardness range than it is a hard rule. 

Eheh…get it? Hard rule? (aaaaaaaaaand i’m done). 

Haa thanks, I can’t even put into words how unappealing the overuse of a soft brush is when rendering. There have even been otherwise expertly painted images that were (in my opinion) ruined by that overly soft ‘airbrush’-y look that soft edged brushes give off. 

I mean, I just really hate soft edged brush in most cases. It’s definitely the fact that you can’t read any real confidence in the brush strokes of a soft edged brush. It makes it really difficult to nail down any solid shapes or forms in your painting. Weak vagueness both in brush strokes and with shape and form is generally not a good thing when painting.

 If I can tell a soft edge brush was used (a lot) in an image, I probably won’t like how it’s been applied.

OH MY GOD THIS

The day I stopped using soft brushes as a blending tool, I felt like I improved more than ever / u\

(via fiona-so)

Tarot asks

The Fool:  Tell an embarrassing story.

The Magician:  Do you have a special talent?

The High Priestess:  Are you good at keeping secrets?

The Empress:  What do you desire most?

The Emperor:  Do you have any family traditions?

The Hierophant:  What is/was your favourite school subject?

The Lovers:  What qualities would your ideal partner have?

The Chariot:  Have you ever had to fight for something?

Strength:  What gives you strength?

The Hermit:  Could you cope with living alone?

Wheel of Fortune:  If you won a million pounds, what would you do with it?

Justice:  If you could be a super hero (or villain) what would you call yourself and what powers would you have?

The Hanged Man:  Would you sacrifice your own life to save someone else's?

Death:  If you were able to reincarnate, what would your next life be?

Temperance:  Do you have good self control?

The Devil:  What do you think your worst quality is?

The Tower:  Describe your dream home.

The Star:  What inspires you?

The Moon:  Describe a dream (or nightmare) you've had recently.

The Sun:  Describe a childhood memory.

Judgement:  Have you ever done something that you were really ashamed of?

The World:  What country would you most like to visit?

kazard:

residentfeline:

how do cats even work

Cats:
A cat can jump up to five times its own height in a single bound.
The little tufts of hair in a cat’s ear that help keep out dirt direct sounds into the ear, and insulate the ears are called “ear furnishings.”
The ability of a cat to find its way home is called “psi-traveling.” Experts think cats either use the angle of the sunlight to find their way or that cats have magnetized cells in their brains that act as compasses.
One reason that kittens sleep so much is because a growth hormone is released only during sleep.
A cat has 230 bones in its body. A human has 206. A cat has no collarbone, so it can fit through any opening the size of its head.
A cat’s nose pad is ridged with a unique pattern, just like the fingerprint of a human.
If they have ample water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats a minute.
 Cats don’t have sweat glands over their bodies like humans do. Instead, they sweat only through their paws.
The claws on the cat’s back paws aren’t as sharp as the claws on the front paws because the claws in the back don’t retract and, consequently, become worn.
Cats make about 100 different sounds. Dogs make only about 10.
Researchers are unsure exactly how a cat purrs. Most veterinarians believe that a cat purrs by vibrating vocal folds deep in the throat. To do this, a muscle in the larynx opens and closes the air passage about 25 times per second.
A cat almost never meows at another cat, mostly just humans. Cats typically will spit, purr, and hiss at other cats.
A cat’s back is extremely flexible because it has up to 53 loosely fitting vertebrae. Humans only have 34.
Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet (20 meters), due largely to their “righting reflex.” The eyes and balance organs in the inner ear tell it where it is in space so the cat can land on its feet. Even cats without a tail have this ability.
A cat can travel at a top speed of approximately 31 mph (49 km) over a short distance.
A cat’s hearing is better than a dog’s. And a cat can hear high-frequency sounds up to two octaves higher than a human.
A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.
And that’s how cats work.

kazard:

residentfeline:

how do cats even work

Cats:

  • A cat can jump up to five times its own height in a single bound.
  • The little tufts of hair in a cat’s ear that help keep out dirt direct sounds into the ear, and insulate the ears are called “ear furnishings.”
  • The ability of a cat to find its way home is called “psi-traveling.” Experts think cats either use the angle of the sunlight to find their way or that cats have magnetized cells in their brains that act as compasses.
  • One reason that kittens sleep so much is because a growth hormone is released only during sleep.
  • A cat has 230 bones in its body. A human has 206. A cat has no collarbone, so it can fit through any opening the size of its head.
  • A cat’s nose pad is ridged with a unique pattern, just like the fingerprint of a human.
  • If they have ample water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
  • A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats a minute.
  •  Cats don’t have sweat glands over their bodies like humans do. Instead, they sweat only through their paws.
  • The claws on the cat’s back paws aren’t as sharp as the claws on the front paws because the claws in the back don’t retract and, consequently, become worn.
  • Cats make about 100 different sounds. Dogs make only about 10.
  • Researchers are unsure exactly how a cat purrs. Most veterinarians believe that a cat purrs by vibrating vocal folds deep in the throat. To do this, a muscle in the larynx opens and closes the air passage about 25 times per second.
  • A cat almost never meows at another cat, mostly just humans. Cats typically will spit, purr, and hiss at other cats.
  • A cat’s back is extremely flexible because it has up to 53 loosely fitting vertebrae. Humans only have 34.
  • Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet (20 meters), due largely to their “righting reflex.” The eyes and balance organs in the inner ear tell it where it is in space so the cat can land on its feet. Even cats without a tail have this ability.
  • A cat can travel at a top speed of approximately 31 mph (49 km) over a short distance.
  • A cat’s hearing is better than a dog’s. And a cat can hear high-frequency sounds up to two octaves higher than a human.
  • A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.

And that’s how cats work.

(via unprecedentedviolence)